How ThirdLove Is Dominating

Tomorrow, online bra brand ThirdLove is opening its first retail store, a temporary pop-up in Manhattan that will run through the end of the year. Fast-growing startups like ThirdLove have technology bred into their bones, and it's exciting to see how the company is disrupting the bra and underwear industry with its innovative use data, machine learning, and tiered loyalty and referral programs.
Yotpo says that customers have since been sharing the brand much more effectively and with the right people - in the first three months of launch, 22.3% of those customers who clicked on referral links went on to make purchases, and many of those referred customers ended up becoming repeat customers.



Despite ThirdLove cofounder Heidi Zak previously stating she had no intention of moving into brick-and-mortar , she said she eventually came to recognize a physical store's potential to reach new consumers, particularly women who prefer to test particularly fickle garments like bras in real life.
Several former and current employees spoke to the outlet about their experiences with the brand, charging that co-CEO David Spector — who is much less visible that his wife, co-CEO Heidi Zak — contributes to an intimidating, dismissive, condescending, and bullying management style, and the company as a whole isn't quite so pro-female-employee as its public image might make it seem.

Over at Vox, reporter Zoe Schiffer has an interesting story about ThirdLove, the upstart bra company that positions its lingerie as by women, for women.” Turns out that contrary to its feminist public image, actually working for the company seems pretty awful: employees complain about a bunch of things, including low pay, shitty benefits, and a co-CEO that bullies them.
Typically, bras come in band sizes from about 32 to 40, and cups from A to E. ThirdLove makes band sizes ranging from 30 to 48 and A to I, with some half-cup sizes (from A½ to E½) interspersed among band sizes 30 to 40. From a manufacturing standpoint, the offerings make sense: Band size and cup size is inversely proportional, so a 34B would have the same cups as a 32C and a 36A.

Provider of lingerie and underwear designed to offer the perfect fit for every company's lingerie comes in 78 sizes which are 40 more than traditional brands, enabling women of every shape to get their desired underwear size that are free from lousyness and bad fits.
When they arrived, they were surprised to find Heidi Zak's husband and co-CEO, David Spector, highly involved in their day-to-day work, with a management style described as condescending” and bullying.” This about-face was compounded by company norms — don't negotiate your salary, don't leave before 6 pm, don't work from home, don't skip a happy hour — that felt out of sync with the brand's external image.

One that includes adjustable lighting, digital measuring systems, three different types of dressing rooms and 78 bra sizes to choose from. They knew that in order to keep delivering bras that fit a wide range of body types better than rival brands - many of which had begun imitating ThirdLove by offering bras in half-cup sizes - they needed more customer data.
From the outside, David Spector appears to be the ideal millennial brand. In June, Zak said that ThirdLove wasn't ruling out physical retail, but explained why the brand hadn't yet tested it. We proudly donate all gently worn bras that are returned to women in need. Still a young company so it's an exciting time to be part of the team.

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